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Bezzy Members Share Their Creative and Versatile Head Covering Ideas

Living Well

February 06, 2024

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Images courtesy of Bezzy member Ceeci

Images courtesy of Bezzy member Ceeci

by Crystal Hoshaw

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Fact Checked by:

Jennifer Chesak, MSJ

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by Crystal Hoshaw

•••••

Fact Checked by:

Jennifer Chesak, MSJ

•••••

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Wig, hat, turban, scarf? How you style yourself during treatment is up to you. Learn what Bezzy members recommend, from hats with pigtails to silky head scarves.

For many, one of the most difficult parts of breast cancer treatment is losing your hair.

In the midst of handling a life threatening illness and navigating treatment, the ability to have some power over your appearance can make a huge difference in your morale, your confidence, and your desire to go out and face the world.

While it may seem inconsequential to some, your hair can signal who you are to others. It can be a symbol of your culture, your identity, and a mode of self-expression that’s so easy to take for granted when you’re not in danger of losing it.

If you’re looking for tips to help put your best face — and hair — forward during treatment, read on for real tips from Bezzy members on how to do just that.

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Connect with thousands of members and find support through daily live chats, curated resources, and one-to-one messaging.

Making hair loss a little bit easier

BezzyBC member Ceeci has come up with some creative solutions to both slowly getting used to hair loss and having some fun with trying new hair, hat, and head-covering styles.

“I … had long hair and cut mine off in several stages,” Ceeci shares. “My best friend shaved it right before my 2nd round of ACT chemo when I could tell it was starting to fall out.”

Ceeci emphasizes that you don’t have to rush.

“Easing into it helped,” she says. “I started going shoulder length before my first chemo infusion, then cut it to my chin, and then a pixie, before letting my friend shave it.”

After that, Ceeci went shopping.

“I got some cute turbans and scarves, but often wore a wig or just a hat or baseball cap when I went out because it didn’t seem to scream “CANCER” as much,” she says.

Ceeci’s turban recommendations

Several other Bezzy members recommend Headcovers Unlimited.

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Hats, head cover, and turban tips

“Turbans with a pre-tied knot were easier than trying to tie a scarf, but I attempted it a couple of times,” Ceeci says.

In addition to turbans and head scarves, Ceeci relied on a natural-looking wig.

A brunette Amazon wig that closely matched her own hair was her go-to. However, she had fun trying a mermaid-style ombre wig as well.

“I also had a baseball cap that had hair attached, and that was easy for grocery runs,” Ceeci says. Ceeci’s option came with cute pigtails that instantly turned her into a blonde.

“Mostly I wore [a] yellow checkered plaid BAGGU cap, but also loved [my] ‘FU to Cancer’ hat!” she adds.

When it comes to the why of hair accessories, Ceeci notes that the way you look is personal.

“It’s a very hard part of this cancer ‘journey’ and not a small thing! Hair is a big part of our identity, and losing it is a visual cue to the world of our sickness,” she says.

Having some control over that visual cue can be a major comfort when you’re undergoing treatment.

“Having support around the hair loss helped. There were plenty of times I stood in the bathroom alone and cried as hair came out in my hands. But letting people in to witness this and hold your hand through can be helpful,” says Ceeci.

There are plenty of unique ways to do this.

“I have a friend who let her kids cut her hair,” Ceeci says. “Another’s husband stood by her while she shaved it herself. Having my friends cut my hair, and especially be there when I shaved it, helped to make the loss not feel as sad.”

BezzyBC member Kmc714 agrees.

I initially thought it was not a big deal, but it is! I cried when my palms were full of hair after lightly touching my head, so I had my buzz cut before everything fell out,” she says.

Like Ceeci, this gave her a sense that she could do something about what she was experiencing.

“It gave me a sense of control amidst feeling hopeless with hair loss,” says Kmc714. “I used a couple of wigs, lots of hats, and some scarves. I watched videos on how to style scarves, but I mostly wore hats due to our hot climate.”

Her most important advice?

“Be gentle on yourself every step of the way 💜,” she writes on the forum.

three images of Ceeci in a scarf, mermaid wig, and baseball hat with blonde pigtails

Takeaway

Hair loss may seem insignificant when you’re facing a life threatening illness. However, your appearance can give you a sense of agency, creativity, and fun during a tough time.

Whatever you decide to do with your hair and your style during cancer treatment, know that it’s totally up to you. There are others out there who can share their tips, tricks, and experiences so you can know you’re not alone.

Fact checked on February 06, 2024


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Connect with thousands of members and find support through daily live chats, curated resources, and one-to-one messaging.

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About the author

Crystal Hoshaw

Crystal Hoshaw is a mother, writer, and longtime yoga practitioner. She has taught in private studios, gyms, and in one-on-one settings in Los Angeles, Thailand, and the San Francisco Bay Area. She shares mindful strategies for self-care through online courses at Simple Wild Free. You can find her on Instagram.

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